Monthly Archives: October 2014

All Hallows Read

Happy Halloween!

Hope it’s a lot of fun.

I have a Halloween tradition I started to follow a few years ago — I give out books. The All Hallow’s Read campaign from Neil Gaiman’s camp, suggests that these should be scary books.

I disagree. I think any book you might get someone to read is an appropriate Halloween book.

Obviously, for my horror and sci-fi friends I find scary books. For my romance friends – paranormals. For the rest of my list though? I pick up books that look interesting. Books that are hiding in the corners of the used book store or the dollar store or anywhere else where I can find inexpensive books. (I would love to buy brand-new books, but I have a lot of people on my list. It would break me.) I get adventure books or shopping books or even how-to books. It all depends on the person. Sometimes, I manage to find those books that started me on a series. I give those to people I hope will be intrigued and start reading the rest of the books. For my “one book a year” friends — hurts my little heart, but they exist — I give lighter book. Shopping books, slim mysteries, cozies — anything I can think of that they might find interesting, or pleasant.

I try to avoid controversial books. For me, this is a holiday where I can define my own gift-giving tendencies.

And hey, books. There’s nothing I love better.

They always get a smile of surprise. Adults aren’t used to getting random presents on Halloween. I think that’s a shame.

(Candy’s cool too though. *winks*)

On a larger note, Halloween is when the veil between the worlds is thinnest. We can reach out to ghosts and ancestors. Books are still a part of this. They are part of the fabric of our society; what makes us human. We tell stories. We create our history. We use our language to inspire, to create, and to connect.

So, go, give someone a book you love and want to share. Old, new, whatever.

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Sunday Night Music: The Skeleton Dance

I’ve decided to start a regular feature here with music. I’ll warn you, my taste in music is… eclectic. (I feel this is being kind. My iPod is cruel enough to pop from Beethoven to Green Day with nothing in between.) Your mileage may vary, but everything’s worth a shot.

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October 26, 2014 · 6:43 pm

Sunday Night Music: Witch’s Rune

I’ve decided to start a regular feature here with music. I’ll warn you, my taste in music is… eclectic. (I feel this is being kind. My iPod is cruel enough to pop from Beethoven to Green Day with nothing in between.) Your mileage may vary, but everything’s worth a shot.

 

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October 19, 2014 · 6:28 pm

Sunday Night Music: Grim Grinning Ghosts

I’ve decided to start a regular feature here with music. I’ll warn you, my taste in music is… eclectic. (I feel this is being kind. My iPod is cruel enough to pop from Beethoven to Green Day with nothing in between.) Your mileage may vary, but everything’s worth a shot.

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October 12, 2014 · 6:09 pm

Disturbing Disorders: Cotard’s Delusion (Walking Corpse Syndrome)

This is absolutely fascinating to me.

I have to wonder if it might be connected to some of the zombie situations in the islands as well. A combination of drugs and a delusional belief.

Wow. Now I have something to research. At the very least it would make an intriguing short story.

The Chirurgeon's Apprentice

C4In 1880, a middle-aged woman paid a visit to the French neurologist, Jules Cotard (pictured below), complaining of an unusual predicament. She believed she had ‘no brain, no nerves, no chest, no stomach, no intestines’. Mademoiselle X, as Cotard dubbed her in his notes, told the physician she was ‘nothing more than a decomposing body’. She believed neither God nor Satan existed, and that she had no soul. As she could not die a natural death, she had ‘no need to eat’.

Mademoiselle X later died of starvation. [1]

Although this peculiar condition eventually became known as ‘Cotard’s Delusion’ the French neurologist was not the first to describe it. In 1788—nearly 100 years earlier—Charles Bonnet reported the case of an elderly woman who was preparing a meal in her kitchen when a draught ‘struck her forcefully on the neck’ paralyzing her one side ‘as if hit by a stroke’. When…

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